World running out of Antibiotics, Warns World Health Organization

, , Comments Off on World running out of Antibiotics, Warns World Health Organization

Most of the drugs at present in the medical pipeline are under modifications of existing classes of antibiotics and are only considered as a short-term solution. According to the recent report, a very few prospective treatment alternatives was found for those antibiotic-defiant infections recognized by WHO as posing the maximum threat to our health, including drug-defiant tuberculosis which takes life of more than 200 000 people every year. Very less new antibiotics are under progress to fight the threat of multidrug-defiant infections, based on the current research study by World Health Organization report. Now adding more to the concern, it is expected that the speed of growing resistance will surely outpace the slow drug growth procedure.

World running out of Antibiotics, Warns World Health Organization

On May 2017, a total of 52 antibiotics and 12 biological medicinal products habitually made from natural sources available are being developed. Tuberculosis infections need a mixture of at least three major antibiotics, according to the latest report; however, only seven of the new tuberculosis medicines are used in clinical trials. Soon, there will be a severe lack of treatment alternatives for this infection based on the current research. This is quiet similar to gram-negative pathogens, which can actually cause harsh, usually fatal infections generally in nursing homes and hospitals. To address the current issue of manufacturing new antibiotics, the WHO and the Drugs for Deserted Diseases proposal set up the Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership. On the other hand, new medicines alone cannot fight the intimidation of anti-microbial resistance. The WHO is also functioning to enhance infection avoidance and control while increasing guidance for the correct usage of antibiotics.

Even though the risk of getting an entire resistance to infection is very low in the USA. About 1.5 Million people every year get infected with the “resistant adequate” bacteria that are very difficult to treat, as said by Hanage. And each year, more than 25,000 people die due to these infections. According to Hanage, “More defiant infections don’t actually mean you or somebody you care about is more probable to die from one, but they also mean healthcare sector will get even more pricey.” He also added, “Many of the methods we take for granted in the field of medicine, from cancer treatments to operations, depend on our capability to get a grip on these infections that happen in the course of healing.”